Dr. Marie-Claire Arrieta - Speaker at Microbiota events
Microbiotaevents chevron Speakers chevron Marie-Claire Arrieta

Dr. Marie-Claire Arrieta

Assistant Professor in the departments of Physiology, Pharmacology and Pediatrics of the University of Calgary, (Calgary, Canada).

Dr. Marie-Claire Arrieta is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Physiology, Pharmacology and Pediatrics of the University of Calgary. Her research group explores the intestinal colonization with microbes early in lab, its ecological patterns, and immune consequences to humans.

Membership in professional and learned societies:

  • CIHR College of Reviewers
  • Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
  • ALLERGEN
  • American Society of Microbiology
  • Canadian Society of Microbiology
     

National and International Committees:

  • Invited member of the Consensus Panel on Fermented Foods.
  • Invited member of the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group (HCEO), founded and based at the University of Chicago. She is a part of a team of the Health Inequality Network.

Dr. Marie-Claire Arrieta is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Physiology, Pharmacology and Pediatrics of the University of Calgary. Her research group explores the intestinal colonization with microbes early in lab, its ecological patterns, and immune consequences to humans.

Membership in professional and learned societies:

  • CIHR College of Reviewers
  • Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
  • ALLERGEN
  • American Society of Microbiology
  • Canadian Society of Microbiology
     

National and International Committees:

  • Invited member of the Consensus Panel on Fermented Foods.
  • Invited member of the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group (HCEO), founded and based at the University of Chicago. She is a part of a team of the Health Inequality Network.
Why you should listen

After obtaining a Licentiate in Microbiology in 2001 at the University in San José, Costa Rica, Marie-Claire Arrieta moved to Canada where she achieved a Master of Sciences in Physiology and Cell Biology at The University of Alberta, in 2005. Her doctoral work then explored the role of intestinal permeability (leaky gut) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Through this work, she became interested in the concept of the gut as the engine of diseases that occur in organs far away from the gut.

She then held the position of post-doctoral researcher in the laboratory of Dr Brett Finlay, a prominent molecular microbiologist who has pioneered many studies in the field of the human microbiome. Since 2016, Marie-Claire Arrieta is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Physiology, Pharmacology and Pediatrics of the University of Calgary.

 

Her research group studies the relationship between the early-gut microbiome and the infant’s immune, metabolic, and neurological development: how intestinal dysfunction may lead to disease in and outside the gut. She is particularly interested in the metabolic aspects of the communication between the intestinal microbial networks, the gastrointestinal tissue, and the immune system. This research is fundamental to generating meaningful progress in health outcome-related knowledge.

 

Research from her lab has shown that bacteria and fungi are engaged in several symbiotic relationships, including in relation to immune responses. Also, their work is unraveling the ecological mechanisms by which infant probiotic use can impact the early-life microbiome in infants born prematurely.

Her research program uses a translational approach, in which samples collected from children are used to characterize the microbial alterations associated with the risk of asthma, obesity or stress dysregulation. The research group also uses mouse models to examine the causality and mechanisms of these associations in mouse models.

 

Besides her research, Marie-Claire Arrieta is an advocate of science communication to the public. She is co-author of a best-selling book, “Let Them Eat Dirt” (Saving your child from and oversanitized world), and is involved in several science communication initiatives, including participation in public talks and documentaries (“Let them eat dirt”).

Key Studies

Samara J. et al.
Supplementation with a probiotic mixture accelerates gut microbiome maturation and reduces intestinal inflammation in extremely preterm infants.
Cell Host and Microbe. 2022 May 11. Doi : 10.1016/j.chom.2022.04.005

 

Gutierrez MW. et al.
"Molding" immunity-modulation of mucosal and systemic immunity by the intestinal mycobiome in health and disease.
Mucosal Immunol. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1038/s41385-022-00515-w https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35474360/

Alshaikh B. et al.
Multi-strain probiotics for extremely preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.
Pediatr Res. 2022 Mar 21. doi: 10.1038/s41390-022-02004-z. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35314794.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35314794/

Moossavi S. et al.
Gut-on-chip for ecological and causal human gut microbiome research.
Trends in Microbiology. 2022. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2022.01.014 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35190251/

Kuchařová Pettersen V. et al.
Inferring early-life host and microbiome functions by mass spectrometry-based metaproteomics and metabolomics.
Computational and Structural Biotechnology. 2021. doi: 10.1016/j.csbj.2021.12.012.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35024099/

Gutierrez MW. et al.
The intestinal mycobiome as a determinant of host immune and metabolic development. 
Current Opinion in Microbiology. 2021. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2021.04.004 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33993019/

Kuchařová Pettersen V. et al.
Metaproteomic Profiling of Differentially Colonized Gnotobiotic Mice Gut.
Animal Microbiome. 2021. doi: 10.1186/s42523-022-00163-2
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35193703/

Partida-Rodriguez O. et al.
Exposure to parasitic protists and helminths changes the intestinal community structure of bacterial microbiota but not of eukaryotes in a cohort of mother-child binomial from a semi-rural setting in Mexico.
MSystems 2021.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34406855/

Dr. Marie-Claire Arrieta’s Microbiota Events

Wednesday, 7th September 2022
4:00pm - 4:25pm (CEST)

Antibiotics: short and long-term consequences in developing microbiota.